House Rules

ADHD&D House Rules

1. Character Creation

• Players may use anything in the core books or the Eberron Campaign Setting, but they must inform the GM of any magic item purchases. The GM reserves the right to veto any magic items.
• There are four basic roles: Warrior (fighter, barbarian, monk, ranger, paladin), Expert (rogue, bard, artificer), Arcane Caster (wizard, sorcerer, bard), and Divine Caster (cleric, druid). PC’s may not duplicate an existing role unless there is already at least one PC in each role. Players are also encouraged, but not required, to avoid multiple characters in the party of the same class.
• Each character gets Background Skills (explained below) as a bonus feat at first level.
• Each character gets knowledge points in addition to skill points as described below.
• Use the point buy system for abilities on p. 169 of the DMG (32 points). No more than one ability may be 18 or higher at first level.
• Players will roll for starting gold, but will take maximum hit points at every level.
• As long as the party contains fewer than 6 PC’s, each player may make a secondary character. Secondary characters will be treated the same as primary characters, with one exception. If the party ever exceeds 6 PC’s, one secondary character will be chosen at random. The player of that secondary character will have two full sessions to remove it from the party or the GM will do it for them in whatever method is appropriate to the plot.
• Because I am fond of moral gray areas, I don’t use traditional alignments. Instead, characters should list 2-5 allegiances (what they are fighting for) and 2-5 abhorrences (what they are fighting against). Good, Evil, Law, and Chaos will still be used as spell descriptors and energy types when referring to undead and certain types of outsiders. “Good” is assumed to mean constructive, and “Evil” is assumed to mean destructive. I assign no moral value to any of the alignments, although NPC’s might, and PC’s are welcome to.
• Each PC must be connected to the plot and to at least one PC played by a different player. Connections to the plot via strong ties to another PC are acceptable. Secondary characters are encouraged, but not required, to be connected to the player’s primary character.
2. Level Advancement: Characters will reach level two after two full sessions, then level three after another three full sessions, and so on, waiting approximately the new level number in sessions before each level. The GM will keep track of this timing, and may adjust it to place level advancement at appropriate breaks in the plot. There will be no penalties for multiclassing.
3. New Characters
• Trading an existing character for a new one is a privilege, not a right. It is the responsibility of any player changing to a new character to gracefully remove the old one, and the player may be asked to delay the switch if the character is important to the plot.
• New characters must follow all character creation rules.
• New characters start at the same level as the party average, but their levelling schedules are one session behind the rest of the party.
4. Feat: Background Skills: Can only be taken at first level or the same level as an NPC Class. Choose one trade (profession or craft skill) and one hobby (craft or perform skill). These two skills are always class skills for this character. The character receives four levels in each of these two skills, plus one level for each later level in an NPC class. This feat may be taken multiple times. Each time, it applies to an additional trade and hobby. Note: Although craft skills may be either trade skills or hobby skills, a player cannot take two craft skills at a time with this feat.
5. Knowledge Skills
• Characters will receive Knowledge points equivalent to 1/2 of their Skill points, rounded down (minimum 1 per level). Knowledge points may only be spent on Knowledge skills.
• Knowledge (Local) and Knowledge (Nobility) are no longer individual skills. Knowledge (Local) will be replaced with Knowledge of specific areas. Knowledge (Nobility) will be replaced with Knowledge of specific cultures.
• Players may take knowledge skills not listed in the rulebooks. If you can convince the GM that one of your knowledge skills should apply, you can make a roll.
6. Immunities: As a general rule, absolute immunities will be replaced by a +20 bonus to the appropriate saving throw. There may be exceptions. So far, it applies to the following immunities:
• Elves’ immunity to sleep (They may be forced to trance.)
• Warforgeds’ immunity to sleep (They may be forced to shut down temporarily.)
• Paladins’ immunity to disease
• Paladins’ immunity to fear
7. Item Creation: Because I don’t use experience points, every character who can create magic items shall receive a craft reserve equal to that of an artificer of the same level. Artificers’ craft reserves are doubled.
8. Critical Hits: If a player rolls a natural 20, the attack automatically does the maximum amount of damage and the player then rolls to confirm the crit. If the confirmation roll succeeds, the player rolls the apppropriate dice for additional damage. If the confirmation roll is also a natural 20, the additional damage is also maximized, but the player does not roll again.
9. “Detect” Spells: Because I don’t use traditional alignments for PC’s or NPC’s, the Detect Good/Evil/Law/Chaos spells are somewhat less useful. To compensate, characters will have access to the following spells, taken from “See No Evil,” Dragon Magazine Issue 323, September 2004, p. 68-72. When characters have a “Detect” spell as part of their race or class special abilities, they may replace it with Detect Guilt or Detect Violence. This substitution must be done at the time the character gains the ability, and cannot be changed.
• Detect Attitude (Divination)
• Level: Brd 1, Clr 1, Pal 1
• Components: V, S, DF
• Casting Time: 1 standard action
• Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft. / 2 lvls)
• Target: One creature
• Duration: Concentration, up to 1 round/lvl
• Saving Throw: None
• Spell Resistance: Yes
• You sense the target’s attitude (see the Player’s Handbook, page 72) toward you by seeing a faintly glowing colored aura surrounding it, visible only to you. You can determine how the target’s attitude changes over time, allowing you to know the effectiveness of attempts to change the target’s attitude. If you cast this spell on someone who has not met you, that person’s aura always appears blue (indifferent).
• Detect Guilt (Divination)
• Level: Clr 1, Pal 1
• Components: V, S, DF
• Casting Time: 1 standard action
• Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft. / 2 lvls)
• Target: One creature
• Duration: Instantaneous
• Saving Throw: None
• Spell Resistance: No
• You sense the presence of guilt in the target creature. This spell in no way reveals why the target feels guilty, only that it does. The level of guilt a creature feels has little to do with whatever act causes the creature’s guilty feelings. A serial killer may feel no guilt for the brutal murders he commits, for example, while a maid might feel strong guilt about forgetting to mop the kitchen floor.
• A creature must have at least 3 Int, 1 Wis, and 1 Cha in order to feel guilt. The spell fails if cast on a creature without those minimum ability scores
• Detect Heresy (Divination)
• Level: Clr 3, Pal 2
• Components: V, S, DF
• Casting Time: 1 standard action
• Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft. / 2 lvls)
• Target: One creature
• Duration: Concentration, up to 1 round/lvl
• Saving Throw: Will negates
• Spell Resistance: Yes
• Prized by inquisitors and martial religious orders, this spell reveals past heretical actions and the current heretical thoughts of the target. You sense the target’s heretical thoughts and past action by seeing a faintly glowing aura surrounding it, visible only to you. The strength of the aura shows the level of heresy. You detect current heretical thoughts in the target as well as all consciously made acts of heresy performed within the past 1 day per caster level. The spell cannot detect heretical acts that occurred prior to the spell’s time limit, regardless of their intensity. You define what constitutes heresy by your own belief structure, even if the majority of faithful disagree.
• This spell only affects people of your own faith, those who say they follow your faith, and those who show aspects of your faith (wearing your deity’s holy symbol, for example, or attending a religious service). Any action or thought that opposes your particular definition of your religion’s dogma or teachings counts as heresy. A character of a different faith doesn’t show as heretical when you cast this spell, although a character pretending to be of your religion shows as committing apostasy/blasphemy.
• The more heretical the thought or act, the stronger the aura of heresy the target displays. By concentrating, you can learn more details of the heretical acts or thoughts.
• 1st Round: Presence of heretical acts in the history of the subject or current heretical thoughts in the subject.
• 2nd Round: Intensity of subject’s current heretical thoughts.
• 3rd Round: Number and intensity of past heretical acts performed by subject.
• Detect Violence (Divination)
• Level: Clr 1, Pal 1, Rgr 1
• Components: V, S, DF
• Casting Time: 1 standard action
• Range: 60 ft.
• Target: Cone-shaped emanation
• Duration: Concentration, up to 1 round/lvl
• Saving Throw: None
• Spell Resistance: No
• When casting this spell, you perceive the residual aura caused by acts of violence committed in the area of effect. The spell detects violence committed within the past 1 month per caster level. The spell cannot detect violent acts that occurred prior to the spell’s time limit, regardless of their intensity.
• Violence does not necessarily end in death, but the more violent the act the stronger the psychic residue left behind. This spell does not detect the capacity to cause violence; it only detects violence committed against a living creature. It also does not specify why the violence was committed, nor the alignment of the assailant or of the victim. By concentrating, you can learn more details of specific violent acts.
• 1st Round: Presence of violence in the area within the spell’s time limit.
• 2nd Round: Number and location of violent acts performed in the area.
• 3rd Round: Strength of aura of violent acts performed.
• 4th and Subsequent Rounds: Number of days and hours since most recent violent act, then of earlier violent acts in chronological progression from second most recent backward, with one act indicated per round.
10. Gear/Component Pools: (from http://www.gamecrafters.net/archives/9)
EQUIPMENT HOUSERULE
The idea is really very simple. Basically, you assume that PCs have basic adventuring gear. Clothing, bedroll, a couple of days worth of food; I’ve never really believed that PCs should have to purchase this stuff separately. You can charge PCs for this stuff if you want to, but I generally don’t. It’s more flavor than anything else, as I see it.
What about specific bits of adventuring gear that could affect the outcome of an encounter, puzzle, trap, or what-not? That’s where the Gear Pool comes into play. Basically, at character creation, players can spend however much gold they want on their Gear Pool; each gold piece equates to one gp worth of Gear. Then, later on, when a character needs, for instance, fifty feet of rope and a grappling hook, you deduct the cost of the needed items from the Gear Pool. You assume that the character had the foresight to buy this stuff while he was out preparing for the adventure, even if the player did not. After all, the character would know better what he needs for adventuring than the player would, wouldn’t he?
Material components work in the same way. Gold is spent to acquire a Component Pool, and when a character needs a costly material spell component, he deducts the cost from his Pool. Thus, casting identify causes you to deduct 100 points from your Material Pool. Simple.
Replenishing the two Pools is just as simple. Any time the characters are in a town or city, or any other place they’d get gear, they can add gold to their two Pools. Certain treasure hoards might also contain Gear Points or Component Points.
• The following items may not be purchased from gear/component pools:
• magic items
• large items
• weapons (ammunition is allowed)
• items costing more than 20 gp
11. Upkeep: Rather than paying for specific food, clothing, and lodging, characters will pay the monthly upkeep on p. 130 of the DMG on the first day of each month. Characters may pay their monthly upkeep anywhere they may replenish their gear/component pools, and may pay as far in advance as they like. If monthly upkeep is not paid, characters must account for all food, clothing, and lodging individually until they pay their upkeep.
12. Backstories: Characters with written backstories will be rewarded with appropriate skill points. If a plot point from a character’s backstory finds its way into the plot of the game, that character will receive a bonus action point. This action point is neither lost nor refilled when levelling up.
13. Death: I generally try to avoid killing PC’s, but I reserve the right to do so if I think it is appropriate. I have a mechanic for returning dead characters to life without resurrection spells, but I don’t think it is appropriate for this to be common knowledge. This view of cosmology slightly alters the effect of Resurrection and similar spells. Players whose characters can cast Resurrection or who have some in-character justification for special knowledge of life after death may approach me for further explanation.

House Rules

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